Little compares to the adrenaline rush on the court: The serving player is leading, 5-2 in the third set, the match seems decided. But then, the first serve is out, the second hits the net. A lucky passing shot of his opponent sets him back to 0-30. Irritated by this sudden resistance, he serves another double fault. A return, unattainable to the far-away server, touches down just behind the net. The service game is lost. After the 5-3, nothing seems to work out anymore. The opponent, sensing the turnaround, moves up a gear.

This or something like it must be the course of Rahel Goetsch’s imaginary tennis game when she creates a drawing in competition with herself that is not to be underestimated. Herself a passionate tennis player, she is familiar with the subtleties of the sport, and even court maintainance finds its equivalent: as a soloistic serpentine.